Raw Raspberry Chocolate Ice Cream

For Vegan Month of Food 2014 I am adapting recipes from the first book I ever learnt to bake from: Chocolat: Fondre de Plaisir by Camille and Nathalie Le Foll. Join me as I veganise 20 recipes from this book – it’s going to be a month of total chocolate decadence!

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If I ever say something along the lines of: ‘I think I’ll do a PhD/another Masters degree’ feel free to slap me. Never again would I want to put myself in such a stressful position, not unless you paid me really good money. But you know what’s even worse than the stress of assignment deadlines paired with the responsibilities of living on your own? Finding a graduate job.

It’s been a super stressful two months since I handed in my Thesis. I had a temporary job at the Edinburgh Book Festival, which was heaps of fun and paid the bills for a month or so, but that’s all it was: temporary. And as my job ended, so returned the sleepless nights, the nail-chewing, the sudden bursting into violent fits of tears, and the terrible eating habits.

How bad can your eating habits get as a vegan? Fairly bad. Eat-porridge-all day kind of bad, or eat-your-weight-in-chocolate kind of bad. My theme choice for Vegan MoFo 2014 hasn’t exactly helped trim my waistline or keep my acne at bay. (TMI?) I have been known to eat peanut butter cup ice cream for breakfast/lunch/dinner in the past. Healthy fats, sure, but I may have eaten more than the recommended daily (or weekly) serving.

So thank goodness for raw vegan ice cream. It’s just fruit blended with a little raw milk and some superfoods if you feel fancy. It’s actually good for you. Some people on Instagram eat it all day, every day. I had this particular cone of raw vegan raspberry and chocolate ice cream (pictured above and below) for my afternoon snack last Sunday.

If you’re like me, you probably won’t say no to having a serving of your five-a-day when you’re having breakfast.

You don’t need an ice cream machine, just a blender and about five minutes to whip up this recipe. Done. 🙂

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Raw Raspberry and Chocolate Ice Cream

  • Servings: makes enough for 2 scoops of each flavour, serves 2 people
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Note: here is a good recipe to make almond milk. You can use the same method to make oat milk or seed milk.

1 cup (about 100g) frozen raspberries
175ml (3/4 cup) raw nut or oat milk, or water
2 ripe bananas, peeled, chopped and frozen
1-2 tbsp cacao powder
1 tbsp coconut sugar
1 tsp maca powder (optional)
extra raspberries, cacao powder or raw chocolate sauce to serve

1. Place the frozen raspberries and milk in a blender and blend until smooth. Keep the machine going while you add the frozen bananas piece by piece. Blend until smooth and creamy.

2. Pour half of the raspberry ice cream into a container and place in the freezer for now. Add the raw cacao and coconut sugar (and maca if using) to the remaining ice cream in the blender and whizz again for a few seconds. Pour this chocolate ice cream into another container and place in the freezer.

3. Freeze both ice creams for about half an hour, just to set hard enough to scoop into evenly shaped balls. Serve with a bit of cacao powder, raw chocolate sauce and/or extra berries.

If leaving the ice cream for longer, take the ice cream out of the freezer and whip for a minute or two every half hour over a period of three hours. This ensures that air is whipped into the ice cream, which prevents it from crystallising into a hard block.

What’s your worst eating habit?

Have you seen my other vegan chocolate recipes for Vegan MoFo 2014? Click here to catch up and don’t forget to subscribe via email (link in the sidebar) so you don’t miss another one. You can also follow me on InstagramTwitterFacebookPinterest and Tumblr! You can also follow my blog through Bloglovin‘.

Love and cookies,
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Raw Chocolate Orange Mousse ‘Mousse Chocorange’

For Vegan Month of Food 2014 I am adapting recipes from the first book I ever learnt to bake from: Chocolat: Fondre de Plaisir by Camille and Nathalie Le Foll. Join me as I veganise 20 recipes from this book – it’s going to be a month of total chocolate decadence!
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I am the last person who would eat a purely raw diet, but I have to hand it to the raw foodists: their desserts are the bomb. All those natural fats (avocados! nuts! coconut oil!) make for the best desserts. Just think of raw cheesecake, raw ice cream, raw chocolate mousse, raw fudge, raw chocolate… the list is endless. You may well already be familiar with blogs such as This Rawsome Vegan Life and Fragrant Vanilla Cake which boast the most impressive looking raw desserts I’ve ever seen.

Mostly, I like raw desserts because they don’t cause havoc with my skin and digestive system. I am not the type of person to deny myself a slice (or five) of cake but sugar is not my friend. Nah-uh. Vegan Month of Food has been fun so far but… I’ve had to wear foundation every single day this month just to cover up my pimples. October will be a month of sugar-cleansing for me, it seems!

Raw Chocolate & Orange Mousse

2 avocados
2 tbsp cacao powder
8 dates, pitted
juice of 2 oranges + zest for topping

Place all the ingredients in a blender and blend till smooth and creamy. Decant into 2 glasses or small pots and enjoy straight away, or refrigerate for a few hours until needed.

Are you a lover of raw desserts? What’s your favourite raw recipe and your favourite raw foods blog?

Have you seen my other vegan chocolate recipes for Vegan MoFo 2014? Click here to catch up and don’t forget to subscribe via email (link in the sidebar) so you don’t miss another one. You can also follow me on InstagramTwitterFacebookPinterest and Tumblr! You can also follow my blog through Bloglovin‘.

Love and cookies,
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Raw Pecan Chocolate Fudge ‘Fudge de la Nouvelle Orléans’

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For Vegan Month of Food 2014 I am adapting recipes from the first book I ever learnt to bake from: 
Chocolat: Fondre de Plaisir by Camille and Nathalie Le Foll. Join me as I veganise 20 recipes from this book – it’s going to be a month of total chocolate decadence!

The original recipe for this fudge is called ‘fudge de la Nouvelle Orléans’ but at first I struggled to see what pecans had to do with New Orleans. Until I read this article, that is. Apparently pralines (often containing pecans) were invented in New Orleans, or at least somewhere in the south of the US. And here I thought they were typically French, or at least European. You learn something new every day!

But according to Wikipedia American pralines are softer and fudgier than French pralines, which brings us to this recipe. It’s marvellously soft and creamy, with a hint of nuttiness. Pecans are first roasted, than blitzed until they become first a powder, then an aromatic nut butter. Add maple syrup, coconut oil and cacao powder, and you end up in chocolate heaven. Try your best not to eat the whole mixture straight out of the blender… (I know, I know, it’s hard!)

Raw pecan chocolate fudge

200g (7 oz) chopped pecans
2 tsp cacao powder
2 tbsp coconut oil
1 tbsp raw coconut sugar
1 tbsp maple syrup
1 tsp vanilla paste or seeds from a vanilla bean

1. Roast the chopped pecans for 10 minutes in a preheated oven at 200ºC (400ºF).

2. Place the roasted nuts in a food processor or high speed blender. Blitz into a powder, then keep blending until the powder starts to become creamy. Add the remaining ingredients and blend a few more seconds until smooth.

3. Scrape the mixture out of the blender and press into a small square or rectangular tin. Smooth the top flat. Freeze for about an hour.

4. Using a sharp knife, cut the fudge into 20 squares of equal size and shape.

Store in an air-tight tin in the freezer for up to a couple of months.

Your last chance at dessert before you die is a choice between praline or fudge – which do you choose? (I’m cruel, I know :P)

Have you seen my other vegan chocolate recipes for Vegan MoFo 2014? Click here to catch up and don’t forget to subscribe via email (link in the sidebar) so you don’t miss another one. You can also follow me on InstagramTwitterFacebookPinterest and Tumblr! You can also follow my blog through Bloglovin‘.

Love and cookies,
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Raw Cinnamon Chocolate Truffles ‘Truffes Légères à la Cannelle’

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For Vegan Month of Food 2014 I am adapting recipes from the first book I ever learnt to bake from: 
Chocolat: Fondre de Plaisir by Camille and Nathalie Le Foll. Join me as I veganise 20 recipes from this book – it’s going to be a month of total chocolate decadence!
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Last week I went to England to visit my mum and sister. Going to Mum’s is always a bit dangerous: you know the kitchen is full of chocolate, and most of it isn’t vegan, but oh it’s so so so tasty that I can’t resist. This time I was powerless because on top of having chocolate, she had TWO boxes of big, fat, juicy, gooey Medjool dates. I may have gone a bit weak in the knees. 

I devoured most of them (sorry, Mum) in two days. Upon our return to London, the Cookie Monster went to market and brought back… more Medjool dates. The bowl was empty by the end of that day. Oopsie.
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The lesson we have learnt: you should never ever leave me alone with a box/bag/bowl of dates. Unless it’s to make tasty raw vegan truffles.
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Raw Cinnamon Chocolate Truffles

  • Servings: makes 9 truffles
  • Print

200g (7 oz) dates, pitted and roughly chopped
1 tbsp + 1 tsp raw cacao powder
1 tsp ground cinnamon

1. Place the dates in a blender or food processor and blitz until transformed into a creamy paste. Decant into a bowl and mix in 1 tbsp raw cacao powder.

2. Roll the chocolate paste into 9 truffles.

3. Combine 1 tsp cacao with 1 tsp ground cinnamon on a plate. Roll each truffle around on the plate until they are all covered in cinnamon and cacao.

Keeps for up to 5 days in an airtight container in the fridge.

Variation: feel free to add 1 tbsp of hemp seeds to the date paste for a protein boost. (And then you can eat these for breakfast too!)

Have you seen my other vegan chocolate recipes for Vegan MoFo 2014? Click here to catch up and don’t forget to subscribe via email (link in the sidebar) so you don’t miss another one. You can also follow me on InstagramTwitterFacebookPinterest and Tumblr! You can also follow my blog through Bloglovin

What’s your Kryptonite food?

Love and cookies,
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Raw Vanilla Rooibos Tartlets

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You may not know this *dripping sarcasm* but I make a lot of cakes and all manner of desserts, so much so that I have pudding nearly every evening and still cannot manage to finish all the delightful delicacies I concoct. So, I always tell my friends that I shall bring them something, and do… sometimes. Transport is a pain when you travel by bicycle and tend to have at least one bag to carry as well. So the cakes, puddings and miscellaneous desserts tend to get left behind, and all too often end up in the bin.
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My friend Fanny often (and rightly) complains that I never bring those treats I promise. Last week I had these raw tartlets, all ready in a pretty box, carefully placed at the bottom of my bicycle basket, under my many other bags, and I set off to campus bright and early on a Tuesday morning for the radio show Fanny I present at 9am. (Hint: listen to it.) But as I presented my box – shock, gasp, horror! – it was apparent they had not survived the journey: the tartlets were a bit softer than I had estimated and had been shook about so that they had virtually melted into one gloopeymess. It tasted good, but by Jove it looked like a massacre in a pastry shop.

And so Fanny was once more disappointed.
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Fanny, this is what your pudding was meant to look like. Better luck next time! (Hopefully.)
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Raw Vanilla Rooibos Tartlets

  • Servings: makes 4 servings
  • Print

For the crust:

50g dates, soaked for 2 hrs
200g brazil nuts, roughly chopped and soaked for 2 hrs

Pulse all ingredients in a food processor or high-speed blender until a dough forms. Press into 3 greased tartlet moulds. They will be rather soft, so bake or dehydrate for a short while if desired.

For the cream filling:

200g cashews, soaked for 2 hrs
50g dates, soaked for 2 hrs
1 tsp vanilla paste (or use fresh seeds from vanilla pods to be completely raw)
180ml (3/4 cup) strong, strong rooibos tea (I used 3 teabags and soaked them in 180ml (3/4 cup) hot water until the water was utterly dark)

Blend all ingredients till smooth. Pour into the moulds.

Refrigerate to allow to set, preferably for a minimum of 1 hour.

Dust with cacao and cinnamon if desired, and eat up!

Love and cookies,

No-Bake Gianduja Chocolate Mousse Cake. Happy Birthday Mum!

My mum’s birthday was actually last week, and we each enjoyed a big slice of this cake then, along with a glass of bubbly. 

If you’ve been following me for a while it probably has not escaped your attention that I am Belgian, and proudly so. I have not lived in my country for three years, two months and seven days (but who’s counting…) but you know the funny thing about moving to another country is that you suddenly become highly patriotic. Whereas Belgium, to me, had seemed to be an endless pit of boredom where I would surely perish if I remained for the rest of my life, a few months after the move it suddenly was a fond memory. The speculaas, the poffertjes, Ghent and the Graslei, my family’s farmhouse, with the field where I walked innumerable kilometres as I studied, repeating my lessons out loud to myself… Gradually, I began to miss all those little things that had never mattered before. Apparently they’ve recently repainted the door of my school; it used to be a gorgeous, deep cyan. That made me very sad. 

And then there’s the chocolate. 

You can throw all the other kinds at me – Swiss, Swedish, German, I don’t care, Belgian chocolate will always be the winner for me. Although there is a very, very good chocolaterie in Berlin, on the Gendarmenplatz, called Fassbender & Rausch, where I may or may not have once have spent over €40 worth of chocolate. You know the latest creation Côte d’Or has come up with, after they invented that lush milk chocolate with Speculaas pieces in it? Dark chocolate stuffed with smashed Amaretti biscuits. I mean, c’mon. Orgasm in a chocolate bar. Beat that, all you over-sweetened, sickly creamy “chocolate” bars. 

But my mum’s favourite chocolate has always been Gianduja. A small packet, wrapped in earthy green paper that made a crinkly sound when you opened it, and stubby green little slabs of chocolate inside. It was Mum’s chocolate and if you took a bar, she’d know it. Hazelnuts and milk chocolate. A heavenly marriage of flavours and textures. What’s that you say – Nutella? Please. 

I was not refined enough to appreciate the luxurious decadence of Gianduja when I was a child. I always preferred milk chocolate, which was so addictive, and then dark chocolate, plain and moody, through my teenage years (how appropriate). 

But I am a grown-up now. I have tasted excellent chocolate, and I have tasted poor chocolate. (That is indeed a not-at-all subtle jab at you, Great Britain. What you call chocolate I call a sin against the word itself.) As I sit here munching on a cheap slab of plain chocolate I miss the idea of the chocolate I used to eat, and then I remember that sadly, the chocolate industry I once loved uses dairy from factory cows, and that, I cannot condone. I used to cheat on dairy chocolate a lot, but less and less as time passes by. Quality is not just about the luxury of the brand; it’s about the ingredients that are used, and were they came from. 

This cake, my friends, is a luxurious, decadent, refined cake, made only with excellent chocolate. Only the best for my mum. 



Notes: 

• I know American and other international readers may not have access to Bourbon creams. Firstly, let me commiserate your loss; life’s not worth living without Bourbon creams (I am not being dramatic here). But any chocolate biscuit will do. Try chocolate Oreos (check that they are vegan!) or other sandwich biscuits with a creamy centre. Always, always check the ingredients list before you buy. 
• You can purchase coconut cream from most large supermarkets in the UK. If you should for some reason not be able to find any, fret not; soya cream or full-fat coconut milk will do the trick. Whatever substitute you opt for, remember that it must set in the fridge. 

Makes one 22cm (9 inch) cake 

For the crust:

300g (10.5 oz) bourbon creams
200g (7 oz) chopped dates, stones removed
2 tbsp hazelnut milk

Line a springform tin with baking parchment. 

Pulse the bourbon creams till they resemble coarse sand. Add the chopped dates and pulse till combined. Pour this sticky mixture into a bowl. Add the hazelnut milk and mix it all together with your hands until you obtain a sticky batter. 

Press this dough into the bottom of your springform tin, making it smooth and even. Leave it to set in the fridge. 

For the Gianduja filling:

400g (14 oz) raw hazelnuts, skins removed and soaked for 30 minutes
250ml (1 cup) hazelnut milk
50ml (about 1/3 cup) maple syrup 
200g (7 oz) dark chocolate
1 tbsp coconut cream

Place the hazelnuts, milk and maple syrup in a food processor and blend on a high speed until the ingredients have become a smooth paste. You will need a powerful processor or blender for this. Mine is old and worn, so I made this paste in batches. 

In a small saucepan over low heat, melt the chocolate and coconut cream together. Be patient, or the chocolate will burn. It should look glossy, and it must not be allowed to bubble. When it has totally melted, pour the chocolate over the hazelnut paste and fold it in. 

Pour the Gianduja mix into the springform tin. Smooth the top with your spatula. Refrigerate until needed. 

For the chocolate ganache and decoration:

3 tbsp icing sugar
3 tbsp dark cocoa powder
250ml (1 cup) (minus 1 tbsp, see above) of cold coconut cream
50g (1.75 oz) chopped hazelnuts

In a bowl, whisk together the ingredients until evenly combined. Pour over the cake. 

Leave the cake to set for at least 3 hours (overnight is always safest). Carefully remove from the springform tin. Bejewel the sides of your cake with chopped hazelnuts by grabbing a handful of them and pressing them into the cake with the palm of your hand. This is messy but loads of fun. Serve straight away. 


What makes you proud of your country?


Homemade Cashew Butter

And the cashew obsession continues. You saw this coming, right?

I’ve read that if you just keep your food processor whizzing for up to half an hour you get perfect creamy nut butter using only nuts. They contain lots of healthy fats so the process would naturally release them without the need to add any other oil(s). 
But alas, I don’t have a food processor; I only have a blender that’s already suffered quite a bit at my hands. It stopped dead for about a week not so long ago and I was sure it was a sign to buy a Vitamix (but alas, funds are low. My birthday’s August 24th, btw *wink wink*)

So I’ve added quite a bit of super-healthy, super-good for you coconut oil. You don’t have to. But I swear it’s yummy. And your skin will thank you.

Makes 375g (1 + 1/2 cup)

250g (8.8 oz) raw cashews, soaked overnight
5-7 tbsp raw coconut oil, melted (more or less depending on the speed and strength of your blender or food processor)
1/2 tsp vanilla paste (optional)
1 tsp ground cinnamon (optional)

Place the cashews in a powerful food processor or high-speed blender such as a Vitamix. Blend with a few tablespoons of coconut oil for 10-15 minutes. Every few minutes stop the processor or blender to scraped down the sides with a spatula; this helps the machine not getting stuck.
Add the vanilla paste and/or cinnamon and keep blending. 
Store in a jar in the fridge for up to 3 days.