Chocolate Marble Cake ‘Marbré au chocolat’

Marble Cake title
For Vegan Month of Food 2014 I am adapting recipes from the first book I ever learnt to bake from: 
Chocolat: Fondre de Plaisir by Camille and Nathalie Le Foll. Join me as I veganise 20 recipes from this book – it’s going to be a month of total chocolate decadence!

Marbré au chocolat seemed to be quite the popular cake when I was little. I remember it as the type of simple cake that mothers would make for their children to take to school bake sales or make just for a ‘quatre heures’ , the afternoon pick-me-up treat. A typical continental marbled cake is made from a basic recipe known as ‘quatre quarts’, which means four quarters: a quarter flour, a quarter butter, a quarter sugar and 4 eggs. From there on, you may add baking powder, flavours and/or decorations.

You know me, I thrive on simplicity. Making a plain loaf cake with two foolproof flavours – vanilla and chocolate – is the key to household bliss. Well, at least it is in my life. But the traditional 4 quarters template didn’t work for me using only plant-based ingredients. I had to add soya milk to make up for the lack of liquid provided by the eggs, but I guess I added too much the first time. The trick turned out to be coconut oil.
marbled cake 1
Coconut oil gives this cake a crunchy top, which is great because, if you’re anything like me, you really enjoy slicing through a loaf with a bread knife and hearing that satisfying ‘crunch’ when you cut through the crust… no? Is that just me? Oh well. It’s the little things in life.

Aside from the joys of slicing through crusty cake, coconut oil is a lot healthier than vegan butter. But that doesn’t really matter because this cake is loaded with sugar and white flour and cocoa powder. If you want to serve this as a breakfast loaf, I would cut the sugar by half because otherwise it really is very sweet, even for me.

Considering autumn is looming ever nearer, I might try making a pumping and chocolate marble cake next…
marbled cake 2

Chocolate Marble Cake

  • Servings: makes one loaf, serves 12
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Notes: Cut the sugar by half if serving this cake as a breakfast loaf. The batter is quite thick, so don’t be surprised if you find it hard to pour into the loaf tin. Trust me, it’s supposed to be like that, and it will turn out fine. Plus it makes the marble shapes more fun.

250g (1 + 2/3 cup) plain flour
1 tsp baking powder
200g (2 cups) of sugar, or less (see note)
250g (1 cup) coconut oil, melted
175ml (3/4 cup) soya milk
1 tsp vanilla paste
2 tbsp cocoa powder
2 tbsp ground flaxseed + 5 tbsp water

1. Pre-heat the oven to 180ºC (350ºF) and line or grease a loaf tin.

2. In a small bowl combine the ground flaxseed and water. Set aside.

3. Sift the flour and baking powder into a large mixing bowl. Make a well in the centre and pour in the sugar, coconut oil, vanilla paste, soya milk and flaxseed mixture. Fold the wet ingredients into the dry.

4. Pour half of the batter into another bowl. Fold in the cocoa powder.

5. Pour half of the vanilla batter into the loaf tin, spreading it out evenly with a spatula. Pour over half of the chocolate batter, smoothing it out over the vanilla batter as best as you can. Repeat with the remainder of the vanilla and chocolate batters.

6. Bake for 1 hour, at which point the top should crack open like the top of a volcano and a skewer should come out clean. Cool on a wire rack before slicing.

I’m bringing this cake with me to a party tonight in celebration of a friend’s move to London. What’s your go-to cake recipe for a celebration?

Have you seen my other vegan chocolate recipes for Vegan MoFo 2014? Click here to catch up and don’t forget to subscribe via email (link in the sidebar) so you don’t miss another one. You can also follow me on InstagramTwitterFacebookPinterest and Tumblr! You can also follow my blog through Bloglovin‘.

Love and cookies,
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Dulce de Leche Millionaire’s Shortbread

dulce de leche mill shortbread TITLE
For Vegan Month of Food 2014 I am adapting recipes from the first book I ever learnt to bake from: 
Chocolat: Fondre de Plaisir by Camille and Nathalie Le Foll. Join me as I veganise 20 recipes from this book – it’s going to be a month of total chocolate decadence!

So this recipe is very, very vaguely adapted from ‘Délices méxicains’. The original recipe is a sort of millionaire’s shortbread with a coconut base, fudge layer in the middle and chocolate coating, but to be honest my first attempt at the coconut layer was a failure, and I was too discouraged to try it again. Since I had been hankering to try my hand at millionaire’s shortbread for about a month now, and it looks pretty much the same as délices méxicains, that’s the recipe I’m sharing with you today.

I find these are easiest to make the night before you assemble the three layers as the dulce de leche layer needs to set for a few hours. I say dulce de leche – it should be a caramel layer, but there is, to my knowledge, no such thing as vegan condensed milk (yet) so I boiled down coconut milk and raw cane sugar until it became a thick, syrupy, and oh-so-sweet cream. Kind of like dulce de leche! It adds a cool texture to this dessert.

So it’s not a traditional millionaire’s shortbread, but in my opinion it has a bit of the autumn spirit about it. I hope you like it! Don’t forget to tweet me @clemcookiefairy or share your creations on Instagram using the hashtags #thevegancookiefairy and tag me.
dulce de leche mill shortbread 2

Dulce de Leche Millionaire's Shortbread

  • Servings: makes 12 squares
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Bottom layer (shortbread):

100g (3.5 oz, or 1/3 cup + 1 tbsp) butter
150g (1 cup) plain flour
40g (1/4 cup) brown sugar

1. Pre-heat the oven to 180ºC (350ºF). Grease a small rectangular baking tin.

2. Place all the ingredients in a mixing bowl. You can use an electric mixer or a food processor to combine them into a smooth dough, or rough the ingredients together with your index and thumb. If working by hand, the mixture will first look like wet sand, then gradually stick together in a smooth, homogenous dough.

3. Press into the greased tin, ensuring it’s perfectly even. Prick the layer with a fork, then bake for 20 minutes.

Get started on the second layer (dulce de leche) but don’t forget to remove your shortbread from the oven once it’s done and let it cool on a wire rack.

Middle layer (dulce de leche):

100g (1/2 cup + 1 tbsp) brown sugar
100g (3.5 oz, or 1/3 cup + 1 tbsp) butter
500ml (2 cups) coconut cream
1/2 tsp espresso powder (optional, but divine)

1. While the shortbread is baking, melt all the dulce de leche ingredients in a medium-sized saucepan. When the liquid starts to boil, reduce the heat till the liquid is simmering, but keep an eye on it and keep stirring regularly. It will take about half an hour to reduce by half of its original volume.

2. Cool completely, then pour over the cooled shortbread. Place in the fridge overnight to set.

Top layer (chocolate):

100g (3.5 oz) chocolate
2 tbsp soya, oat or almond milk

1. Melt the ingredients on low heat in a small saucepan, stirring all the while.

2. Set aside to cool.

3. Pour over the dulce de leche layer and return to the fridge for another two hours at least.

Final step: once the chocolate layer has hardened, use a sharp knife to cut the shortbread into 12 equal pieces. Keeps in the fridge for up to 3 days in an airtight container.

What about you – are you looking forward to the colder season? (Confession: I’m looking forward to winter so much that I’ve already bought Christmas decorations for an upcoming recipe. Oops. #sorrynotsorry)

Have you seen my other vegan chocolate recipes for Vegan MoFo 2014? Click here to catch up and don’t forget to subscribe via email (link in the sidebar) so you don’t miss another one. You can also follow me on InstagramTwitterFacebookPinterest and Tumblr! You can also follow my blog through Bloglovin‘.

Love and cookies,
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Gluten-free Almond and Chocolate Fudge Mini Cakes ‘Amandine au chocolate’

Amandine TITLEFor Vegan Month of Food 2014 I am adapting recipes from the first book I ever learnt to bake from: Chocolat: Fondre de Plaisir by Camille and Nathalie Le Foll. Join me as I veganise 20 recipes from this book – it’s going to be a month of total chocolate decadence!
Amandine 2
This cake turned out even better than I could have imagined. I made two wee cakes in case one of them turned out wrong, but really the greatest danger was me eating both cakes before I could photograph them. They are that good: dark, fudgey, divinely sweet – and totally gluten-free and vegan. Score!

Amandine is a Romanian type of chocolate cake usually filled with almond cream. The recipe I was adapting did not call for almond cream but instead used almond flour (almond meal), which, combined with the melted chocolate and (vegan) butter makes this whole cake gooey and fudgey. Basically the best thing to eat. Ever.

The cakes rise quite a bit the first fifteen minutes or so in the oven, then they start to fall. Don’t be alarmed by this – that’s how they are supposed to be! There’s something so nice and homely about a fallen cake: the crackled top, the fudgey centre, the not-quite-so-perfect look about it. Nobody cares that it doesn’t look like the winning cake on the Great British Bake Off because that’s not the point of it in the first place.

I assume it’s possible to make one medium-sized cake from this recipe (roughly 20 cm/7-8 inch) but, being on a tight Vegan MoFo schedule, I haven’t tried this myself. If you do, let me know how it turns out!
Amandine 5

Gluten-Free Almond and Chocolate Fudge Mini Cakes

  • Servings: makes two 15cm (6 inch) cakes
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100g (1/2 + 1/3 cup) ground almonds
2 tbsp cornflour
1 tsp baking powder
1 tbsp ground flaxseed + 3 tbsp water
80g (1/2 cup) raw cane sugar
125g (4.4 oz) dark chocolate, chopped
60g (1/4 cup) vegan butter
1 tbsp smooth almond or peanut butter
80ml (1/3 cup) oat milk (or other dairy-free milk)
1 tsp almond extract (optional)

1. Pre-heat the oven to 180ºC (350ºF). Grease 2 15cm (6 inch) round springform tins.

2. In a heatproof bowl suspended over a pan of simmering water, melt the chopped chocolate and butter. While you are doing this (and keeping an eye on it) combine the ground almonds, cornflour, baking powder and raw cane sugar in a large bowl. Also mix the water and ground flaxseed in a small cup and set aside to gel.

3. Once the chocolate is melted, pour into the bowl of dry ingredients. Also add in the oat milk, almond extract (if using), flax “egg” and nut butter, and fold in the wet ingredients.

4. Divide the batter between the two cake tins. Bake for about 25 minutes, or until the sides come away from the inside of the tins and the middle of the cakes have risen and fallen a little.

5. Cool on a wire rack before removing the cakes from their tins. Dust with icing sugar if desired.

Have you ever made a fallen cake? (On purpose – not a failed cake! :P )

Have you seen my other vegan chocolate recipes for Vegan MoFo 2014? Click here to catch up and don’t forget to subscribe via email (link in the sidebar) so you don’t miss another one. You can also follow me on InstagramTwitterFacebookPinterest and Tumblr! You can also follow my blog through Bloglovin‘.

Love and cookies,
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Double Chocolate & Vanilla Ice Cream Sundae ‘Chocolat liégeois’

chocolat liégeois TITLE
For Vegan Month of Food 2014 I am adapting recipes from the first book I ever learnt to bake from: Chocolat: Fondre de Plaisir by Camille and Nathalie Le Foll. Join me as I veganise 20 recipes from this book – it’s going to be a month of total chocolate decadence!

You may look at this Sundae and think, ‘I’ll never be able to finish this all by myself.’ You are capable of so much more than you think, so dig in, and see if you don’t end up scraping the bottom of the glass when you’re done ;)

I was particularly eager to create this recipe because, aside from containing nothing but heavenly ingredients, it’s connected to the city of Liège, where my late paternal grandmother lived. We used to drive the long 2 hours from Ursel to Liège, across the country, to visit my grandmother. Mum always prepared her a large crate of books – mostly thrillers and crime novels – which she then exchanged for the books my grandmother had read. We’d go eat at a nice restaurant and usually have ice cream for dessert. She was a lovely woman; I wish I could have known her better.
chocolat liégoesois 1

Double Chocolate & Vanilla Ice Cream Sundae

  • Servings: serves one
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Per person:

1 scoop vegan vanilla ice cream
1 scoop vegan chocolate ice cream
1 vegan wafer or ice cream cone

For the chocolate sauce:
30g dark chocolate, chopped
1 tbsp non-dairy milk
1 tsp maple syrup
1/2 tsp vanilla sugar or vanilla extract

For the whipped cream:
125ml (1/2 cup) coconut cream
1/2 tsp stevia powder (or 1 tbsp icing sugar)

1. Prepare the coconut whipped cream: in a small bowl, whip the sweetener and coconut cream into stiff peaks. Keep in the fridge until needed.

2. For the chocolate sauce: place all the ingredients in a small saucepan over medium heat. Stir regularly until melted. Remove fro the heat.

3. Assemble the sundae: add one scoop of chocolate ice cream to a sundae glass, then a scoop of vanilla ice cream. Top with the whipped cream and plant your wafer or cone into the ice cream. Top with the hot chocolate sauce and enjoy immediately.

Do you think you could finish this all by yourself? ;)

Have you seen my other vegan chocolate recipes for Vegan MoFo 2014? Click here to catch up and don’t forget to subscribe via email (link in the sidebar) so you don’t miss another one. You can also follow me on InstagramTwitterFacebookPinterest and Tumblr! You can also follow my blog through Bloglovin‘.

Love and cookies,
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Irish Chocolate

Irish Chocolate title
For Vegan Month of Food 2014 I am adapting recipes from the first book I ever learnt to bake from: 
Chocolat: Fondre de Plaisir by Camille and Nathalie Le Foll. Join me as I veganise 20 recipes from this book – it’s going to be a month of total chocolate decadence!

Sometimes I think my life could have turned out a lot different if I had taken another path when I met a Fork in The Road (note the capitals!) at the age of 16. I was beginning to consider university options abroad, feeling deep down that Belgium was no longer where I was meant to be, and Mum found this course called ‘Creative Writing’. Up till then I’d never known you could study writing (I’m still not sure you can) but it sounded like the perfect course for me. We had been planning, my mum, my sister and I – to go on holiday in Ireland over the summer of 2009. Instead, we went to Scotland to visit the University of St Andrews, where I was set on going.

Long story short: I fell in love with Scotland the moment I set foot in Edinburgh. (And about 8 months later I received a crushing letter of rejection from St Andrews.)

But what if I’d gone to Ireland? Dublin blew me away when I was there two years ago; I could fallen in love with the Emerald Isle instead of the romantic Highlands. But hey, no regrets.

What if this, what if that… There is no knowing. You can only drown the doubts in some whiskey and chocolate ice cream.
irish chocolate collage

(On a side note: I am not at all pleased with my photos for this recipe. The end of summer has snuck up on me and as a result, the dramatic decline in daylight hours is becoming problematic for this foodie blogger. Looks like I’ll have to start planning my photoshoots more carefully.)

Irish Chocolate

Notes: if you are limited for options and can’t find any vegan chocolate ice cream anywhere near you, try blending vegan vanilla with 2 tbsp cocoa powder in a food processor. Freeze for about 10 minutes to set, then serve. Or try making your own; I have tons of vegan ice cream recipes in my e-book The Vegan Cookie Fairy’s Decadent Ice Creams Anyone Can Make (US title: Decadent Ice Creams Without An Ice Cream-Maker).

For the coconut whipped cream:

250ml (1 cup) coconut cream
1 tsp powdered stevia (or 2 tbsp icing sugar)

For the Irish coffee:

1 cup of hot coffee
1 shot of whiskey
1/2 tsp powdered stevia (or 2 tsp regular sugar)

For the ice cream:

500ml (2 cups) vegan chocolate ice cream

1. Whip the coconut cream and stevia in a small bowl until stiff peaks form. Refrigerate until needed.

2. Combine the ingredients for the Irish coffee mixture by briskly whisking them all together in a jar.

3. Serve 2 scoops of chocolate ice cream per person. Top with a dollop of whipped cream and pour over the hot Irish coffee. Enjoy immediately.

Have you ever met that Fork with a capital F? What did you do, or what do you wish you’d done?

Have you seen my other vegan chocolate recipes for Vegan MoFo 2014? Click here to catch up and don’t forget to subscribe via email (link in the sidebar) so you don’t miss another one. You can also follow me on InstagramTwitterFacebookPinterest and Tumblr! You can also follow my blog through Bloglovin‘.

Love and cookies,
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Chocolate Spice Cake ‘Cake aux épices’

choc spice cake TITLE
For Vegan Month of Food 2014 I am adapting recipes from the first book I ever learnt to bake from: 
Chocolat: Fondre de Plaisir by Camille and Nathalie Le Foll. Join me as I veganise 20 recipes from this book – it’s going to be a month of total chocolate decadence!

The annoying thing about adapting non-vegan cake recipes is replacing the eggs.

Most people, when they come to vegan baking (and I include myself in this group) tend to think eggs are just used for binding. Wrong. Binding is actually a very small problem and easily dealt with. It’s volume and liquid-to-solid ratio that is the issue. The original recipe for this cake aux épices calls for 4 eggs but no milk, water or even oil. The eggs clearly serve the purpose of adding liquid, binding the ingredients together and ensuring the cake rises properly to be moist yet light and thick enough.

This is where the vegan baker has to get creative. I’ve added oat milk and soya yogurt to the batter to make it properly runny as well as 2 ‘flax eggs’ (2 tbsp group flaxseed + 6 tbsp water, mixed in a bowl and left to gel). I’ve also had to add more flour just to obtain enough batter to fill my cake tin.

The result: a moist, delicately spiced, not too choccolatey but totally moreish cake. Cut it up into small squares and serve it up on a nice platter at a party – I promise you they’ll be gobbled up in the blink of eye. Maybe best to make a double batch…
choc spice cake 2

Chocolate Spice Cake

  • Servings: makes 20 squares
  • Print

225g (1 + 1/2 cups) plain flour
1 tsp baking powder
1 tsp ground ginger
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp ground nutmeg
80g (1/2 cup) raw cane sugar (brown sugar)
100g (3.5oz) dark chocolate, roughly chopped
125g (1/2 cup) vegan butter + extra for greasing
75ml (1/3 cup) maple syrup
125ml (1/2 cup) oat or soya milk
125ml (1/2 cup) soya yogurt
2 tbsp ground flaxseed + 6 tbsp water

1. Pre-heat the oven to 160ºC (320ºF). Grease a 20 x 29 cm (8 x 11 inch) cake tin.

2. Mix the ground flaxseed and water in a small bowl to create flax ‘eggs’. Set aside; after a few minutes the mixture will gel together.

3. Sift the dry ingredients into a large mixing bowl.

4. Place a heat-proof bowl over a pan of hot water. Add the sugar, chocolate, vegan butter, maple syrup and oat milk to it. Stir to combine the ingredients as they melt.

5. Pour the chocolate mixture into the dry ingredients, as well the soya yogurt and flax ‘eggs’. Mix until just combined.

6. Pour the batter into the greased cake tin, then smooth out the top with a spatula. Bake for about 40 minutes, or until the sides of the cake begin to come away from the tin and a skewer comes out of the middle clean.

7. Cool on a wire rack before flipping onto a tray and cutting up into 20 pieces.

Any tips to replace eggs in cake recipes? Write them down in the comments below :)

Have you seen my other vegan chocolate recipes for Vegan MoFo 2014? Click here to catch up and don’t forget to subscribe via email (link in the sidebar) so you don’t miss another one. You can also follow me on InstagramTwitterFacebookPinterest and Tumblr! You can also follow my blog through Bloglovin‘.

Love and cookies,
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Hazelnut Chocolate Bundt Cake with Butterscotch Sauce ‘Noisettine au coulis de caramel’

Hazelnut chocolate bundt cake with butterscotch sauce title
For Vegan Month of Food 2014 I am adapting recipes from the first book I ever learnt to bake from: 
Chocolat: Fondre de Plaisir by Camille and Nathalie Le Foll. Join me as I veganise 20 recipes from this book – it’s going to be a month of total chocolate decadence!

I remember the first time I made this cake. It was the summer I was 17 going on 18; I had just graduated from high school and had 3 blissful months of sweet nothing to do until I moved to London to read English and Creative Writing. I practiced playing ‘Mona Lisa [When The World Comes Down]‘ by The All-American Rejects on the guitar every day in the garden and went to the gym every day to try and lose weight (not that I needed to, but I had a very distorted body image back then). Mum and I saw ‘Julie & Julia’ at the cinema one evening, an event which was to be downfall of my gym routine as I instantly fell in love with cooking and baking. I kept going to the gym but I also made cakes at least twice a week. I baked them all from Chocolat: Fondre de Plaisir.

This butterscotch sauce was out of this world – so good that I had a spoonful straight out of the pan, and then another, and ten more. I’d never tasted anything so sweetly satisfying. Sugar, cream and honey melting together in a pool of perfect golden delight.
Noisettine 2
Revisiting the recipes from this book I’ve realised that in French baking there is a tradition of melting solid chocolate and incorporating it into the cake batter, in contrast to most American and British recipes I’ve read on the Internet, which use cocoa powder. The latter is admittedly a cheaper option, but it steals a heavenly experience from the baker: melting the chocolate.

Have you ever melted chocolate? Oh, there’s nothing like it. In ‘Julie & Julia’ the modern day heroine, Julie, after a harrowing day at her godawful job, returns home with several packets of butter and begins melting them into a pan. ‘Is there anything in the world better than butter?’ she asks. Yes, there is: melting butter and chocolate together.

Go do that today and if you don’t feel the tiniest shiver of childish joy, I wash my hands of you.
Noisettine 3

Hazelnut Chocolate Bundt Cake with Butterscotch Sauce

  • Servings: makes roughly 10 servings
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Notes: I use wholemeal flour in these recipes because I happen to have (well, had) 2kg of it in my cupboards. If coconut sugar is too intense for you, use regular raw cane sugar instead.

You will need: a small-medium sized bundt tin. (If in doubt, go for the smaller size.The original recipe is a traditional round cake, so feel free to use a small round springform cake tin if you wish.)

For the cake:

150g (1 cup, tightly packed) self-raising wholemeal flour
150g (5.3 oz) roasted hazelnuts, roughly chopped
75g (1/2 cup) coconut sugar
100g (1/3 cup + 1 tbsp) vegan butter
200g (7 oz) dark chocolate, roughly chopped
5 tbsp soya milk
2 tbsp ground flaxseed + 6 tbsp water

For the butterscotch sauce:

80g (1/2 cup) coconut sugar
150ml (2/3 cup) rice, oat or soya cream

1. Pre-heat the oven to 180ºC (350ºF). Grease the bundt tin and set aside.

2. Combine the first three ingredients (minus a handful of chopped hazelnuts) in a large mixing bowl. Lightly whisk the ground flaxseed and water in a smaller bowl (these are your ‘flax eggs’ ) and set aside for now.

3. Place a small saucepan over medium heat. Melt the butter, chopped chocolate and milk, stirring till smooth. Pour into the bowl of dry ingredients, folding in the flax eggs too. Mix till just combined.

4. Pour the batter into the bundt tin, smooth out the surface with a spatula. Bake for 30 minutes exactly.

5. Meanwhile prepare the butterscotch sauce: add the coconut sugar to a medium-sized pan over fairly high heat and leave to melt for about 3-5 minutes. Gradually pour in the cream, stirring quickly and constantly. Simmer for ten minutes until reduced by about a quarter, then set aside to cool.

6. Carefully flip the cake onto a platter, pour over the cooled butterscotch sauce and top with the leftover chopped nuts. Enjoy now or save for later.

What is the first cookbook you ever learnt to cook or bake from?

Have you seen my other vegan chocolate recipes for Vegan MoFo 2014? Click here to catch up and don’t forget to subscribe via email (link in the sidebar) so you don’t miss another one. You can also follow me on InstagramTwitterFacebookPinterest and Tumblr! You can also follow my blog through Bloglovin‘.

Love and cookies,
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